The influence of mowing regime on the soil seed bank of the invasive plant Ambrosia artemisiifolia L.

Citation: Milakovic I, Karrer G (2016) The influence of mowing regime on the soil seed bank of the invasive plant Ambrosia artemisiifolia L. NeoBiota 28: 39-49. doi: 10.3897/neobiota.28.6838

NeoBiota full text

Abstract: Ambrosia artemisiifolia is an invasive annual herb infamous for the high allergenicity of its pollen, which is related to increasing medical costs. Additionally, it can cause serious yield losses as agricultural weed. Common ragweed seeds accumulate in the soil and can remain therein viable for decades, which poses a problem for the sustainable management of these populations. A long term management should thus target a reduction of the soil seed bank. We observed the influence of four different mowing regimes on the ragweed soil seed bank at six roadside populations in eastern Austria. The mowing regimes were based on methods from common roadside management practice and specifically adapted to reduce seed production. After three years of application, the soil seed bank was indeed reduced by 45 to 80 percent through three of the four mowing regimes tested. Therefore, we suggest that the best mowing regime for the most effective reduction of the size of the soil seed bank is the one consisting of one cut just after the beginning of female flowering (around the 3rd week of August in Eastern Central Europe), followed by a second cut 2–3 weeks later.

Call for students: field work on biocontrol and population dynamics of ragweed

The Müller-Schärer Group of the University of Fribourg, Switzerland invites students to apply for a research period to participate in field research on biological control of ragweed by the accidentally introduced ragweed leaf beetle Ophraella communa, and on the population dynamics of ragweed. This includes experiments in Switzerland, Italy and France, with different collaborators from the SMARTER Task Forces Ophraella and Population Dynamics.

Applications can be submitted until 15 January 2016.

click here to enlarge flyercall Ambrosia-Ophraella 2016

 

IRS Conference grants for young researchers

The 6th European Symposium on Aerobiology (ESA), the second under the aegis of the European Aerobiology Society EAS, will take place 18-22 July 2016 in Lyon, France. During this meeting, there will be a specific ragweed session in partnership with IRS-EAS-COST-SMARTER.

The International Ragweed Society (IRS) is pleased to offer 3 grants (for 2 oral presentations and 1 poster) for young ragweed researchers (under 35 years of age). Applications are expected from researchers studying any aspect of Ragweed. Those who are awarded a grant will receive a contribution for their participation to the entire European Symposium.

More information can be found on the Symposium website, and on the grant application in this pdf: IRS GRANTS.

We hope that that this is of interest. We look forward to receiving many applications, and hopefully to see YOU in Lyon next summer.

Seasonal variation of airborne ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia L.) pollen in Zagreb, Croatia

Citation: Stjepanović, B., Svečnjak, Z., Hrga, I., Večenaj, A., Šćepanović, M. and Barić, K. (2015). Seasonal variation of airborne ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia L.) pollen in Zagreb, Croatia. Aerobiologia 31(4), 525-535.

SpringerLink

Abstract: Previous research indicated that airborne ragweed pollen concentrations may be influenced by weather-related factors. Therefore, the object of this work was to examine the variation in daily pollen concentrations during four ragweed pollen seasons (2006–2009) in the highly urban area of Zagreb. Ragweed pollen grains were collected using a Burkard volumetric sampler (N45°49′55″, E15°58′54″). Meteorological data (maximum, minimum and mean temperatures, relative humidity, wind speed, precipitation, atmospheric pressure and irradiance) were related to daily pollen counts during the ragweed pollen season. The ragweed pollen season started around late July in 2007 and 2009, while it started on 15 August in 2006, the year characterized by a cold spring. However, the start dates of the pollen seasons were not related to the accumulation of thermal units. Maximum daily concentration of 363 grains m−3 was detected on 27 August 2008. Total airborne pollen concentrations ranged from 1188 grains m−3 in 2007 to 4384 grains m−3 in the following year, whereas the duration of ragweed pollen season varied from 50 days in 2008 to 72 days in 2007. The peak of the ragweed pollen season varied from 21 days in 2007 to 36 days in 2009 for airborne pollen concentrations ≥20 grains m−3 and from 1 day in 2007 to 20 days in 2008 for airborne pollen concentrations >80 grains m−3. Airborne pollen levels were affected by weather parameters such as temperature, sunshine, relative humidity, precipitation and wind speed in some ragweed pollen seasons in Zagreb, but these responses were inconsistent over the entire investigated period. Our study showed that large year-to-year variations in atmospheric pollen concentrations in Zagreb could not be consistently related to any of the analysed weather parameters.

Poster: Airborne Ambrosia pollen in the Milan area in relation to the accidental introduction of the coleoptera Ophraella communa

Citation: Bonini, M., Testoni, C., Branko, Š., Prentović, M., Cislaghi, G., Colombo, P., Grewling, Ł., Lommen, S. T.E. (2015) Airborne Ambrosia pollen in the Milan area in relation to the accidental introduction of the coleoptera Ophraella communa. Poster Presentation. Congresso A.I.A. 2015, September 2015, Como, Italy

This poster was presented by SMARTER members at the Italian Association of Aerobiology (A.I.A.®) Congress that was held on 24-26 September 2015, AT Vertemate c/Minoprio (Como) Italy (Italian language PDF 1.1MB)